Volume 4, Issue 2, March 2019, Page: 80-86
Constraints of Agricultural Input Supply and Its Impact on Small Scale Farming: The Case of Ambo District, West Shewa, Ethiopia
Tilahun Kenea, Department of Agribusiness and Value Chain Management, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Science, Ambo University, Ambo, Ethiopia
Ahimed Umer, Department of Agribusiness and Value Chain Management, Mettu University, College of Agriculture and Forestry, Bedele, Ethiopia
Zinabu Ambisa, Department of Agricultural Economics, Mettu University, College of Agriculture and Forestry, Bedele, Ethiopia
Received: Feb. 17, 2019;       Accepted: Mar. 25, 2019;       Published: Apr. 29, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijae.20190402.15      View  24      Downloads  24
Abstract
Agriculture is a principal economic activity mainly for those developing countries. This study was intended to analyze the impact of agricultural input supply on small scale farming in the study area; to examine the trends and forms of farming practiced by the farmers, to identify the farm input constraint existed in the study area, to assess input supply and its link with forms of farming. Both primary data and secondary were used for the study. In the survey three different forms of farming were identified. These are farmers who cultivate their own lands, rent out their land and rent in other’s land. A formal and informal survey was conducted to gather information in Ambo district by using descriptive sampling techniques. The major output of the study indicates that agricultural input supply is poor in the study area. Moreover, input supply is influenced by major factors like input price, absence of input supply at the right time, credit constraint, farm size and annual income. Therefore, it is recommended that, improving the efficiency of credit system, timely and sufficient amount of delivering credit to farmers who engaged on crop production has to be considered, establishing efficient extension service in the study area is mandatory.
Keywords
Agriculture, GDP, Agricultural Input Supply, Forms of Farming, Input Constraint, Small Scale Farming, Formal and Informal Survey
To cite this article
Tilahun Kenea, Ahimed Umer, Zinabu Ambisa, Constraints of Agricultural Input Supply and Its Impact on Small Scale Farming: The Case of Ambo District, West Shewa, Ethiopia, International Journal of Agricultural Economics. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2019, pp. 80-86. doi: 10.11648/j.ijae.20190402.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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